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  • 09 Jan 2019
    Happy 2019! My journey of helping others regain quality of life and financial freedom continues. 01/08/2019 was my 1st 4 figure day in 2019 of residual income. I was paid 43 times today and will be paid on the 8th EVERY month. What could you do with an extra $5700 every month? If you would like more info, text “2019” to (224) 293-0021.    
    43 Posted by Yolanda Moore
  • Happy 2019! My journey of helping others regain quality of life and financial freedom continues. 01/08/2019 was my 1st 4 figure day in 2019 of residual income. I was paid 43 times today and will be paid on the 8th EVERY month. What could you do with an extra $5700 every month? If you would like more info, text “2019” to (224) 293-0021.    
    Jan 09, 2019 43
  • 10 Feb 2018
    How to Move On From a Bad DecisionThey say that the more mistakes you make, the more successful you become. That might be true, but you must deal with your bad decisions effectively before you can move forward. There’s a process to making the most of your poor decisions.If you can benefit from your good decisions and your poor decisions, life is easy! Unfortunately, our natural instincts make it challenging to benefit from poor choices. We become upset, distract ourselves, withdraw, feel embarrassed, or give up altogether.When you can benefit from poor decisions, there are no poor decisions!Consider these strategies:1.Learn the lesson. Every bad decision has a lesson to teach. It can be painful to examine your poor choices. Do you know what’s even more painful? Making the same mistake again. Take a little time to figure out what you can learn from your unwise decision.2.Move on. There’s nothing to be gained by dwelling on your mistakes. A poor decision that you’ve never made before isn’t a bad thing. It’s just life.3.Take responsibility. You were part of the problem. There’s no getting around it. Taking responsibility allows you to retain control of the situation. You made the mess, so you can fix it.4.Talk it out. If you can’t let go of your mistake, spend some time talking with aloyal friend. An outsider often has a more reasonable perspective. Pick up the phone and give someone a call.5.Stay present. It’s easy to let your mind run wild after making a poor choice. There’s nothing to see there. It’s hard to stay in the present moment when things are going wrong all around you. Allowing your mind to wander is just a form of distraction. Pay attention to what is happening right now.6.Take preventative measures in the future. How can you prevent a similar occurrence in the future? Did you put yourself into a situation where no good option existed? Or did you merely make the wrong call?7.Remember what you still have. You may have lost your business or your partner, but that doesn’t have to be the end of the world. Take a moment to remind yourself of the wonderful things you still have.8.Forgive yourself. Everyone makes more than a few mistakes. Accept the consequences of your choice and move forward. It’s impossible to always make perfect decisions.9.Remember that your next good decision will feel that much better. A vacation only feels good because you contrast it with work. Spend six months in a Florida condo and see how excited you still are. Your bad decisions make your good decisions that much more enjoyable.10.You are not your decisions. You are separate from the choices you make. Bad choices don’t make you bad any more than good decisions make you good. Your decisions don’t define you.Bad decisions aren’t all that bad after all. In fact, you can benefit from all your previous bad choices right now. Make a list of every poor decision you’ve ever made.Now, go through the process of learning from each of them. What are the lessons you can learn? Imagine if you had done this same process after each mistake was made. Your life would be very different.Everyone makes bad decisions. The key is to make the most of them. Spend a few minutes each week reviewing your bad choices and learn from them. Most importantly, avoid repeating them. Move on from your bad decisions and benefit from them.
    360 Posted by Yolanda Moore
  • How to Move On From a Bad DecisionThey say that the more mistakes you make, the more successful you become. That might be true, but you must deal with your bad decisions effectively before you can move forward. There’s a process to making the most of your poor decisions.If you can benefit from your good decisions and your poor decisions, life is easy! Unfortunately, our natural instincts make it challenging to benefit from poor choices. We become upset, distract ourselves, withdraw, feel embarrassed, or give up altogether.When you can benefit from poor decisions, there are no poor decisions!Consider these strategies:1.Learn the lesson. Every bad decision has a lesson to teach. It can be painful to examine your poor choices. Do you know what’s even more painful? Making the same mistake again. Take a little time to figure out what you can learn from your unwise decision.2.Move on. There’s nothing to be gained by dwelling on your mistakes. A poor decision that you’ve never made before isn’t a bad thing. It’s just life.3.Take responsibility. You were part of the problem. There’s no getting around it. Taking responsibility allows you to retain control of the situation. You made the mess, so you can fix it.4.Talk it out. If you can’t let go of your mistake, spend some time talking with aloyal friend. An outsider often has a more reasonable perspective. Pick up the phone and give someone a call.5.Stay present. It’s easy to let your mind run wild after making a poor choice. There’s nothing to see there. It’s hard to stay in the present moment when things are going wrong all around you. Allowing your mind to wander is just a form of distraction. Pay attention to what is happening right now.6.Take preventative measures in the future. How can you prevent a similar occurrence in the future? Did you put yourself into a situation where no good option existed? Or did you merely make the wrong call?7.Remember what you still have. You may have lost your business or your partner, but that doesn’t have to be the end of the world. Take a moment to remind yourself of the wonderful things you still have.8.Forgive yourself. Everyone makes more than a few mistakes. Accept the consequences of your choice and move forward. It’s impossible to always make perfect decisions.9.Remember that your next good decision will feel that much better. A vacation only feels good because you contrast it with work. Spend six months in a Florida condo and see how excited you still are. Your bad decisions make your good decisions that much more enjoyable.10.You are not your decisions. You are separate from the choices you make. Bad choices don’t make you bad any more than good decisions make you good. Your decisions don’t define you.Bad decisions aren’t all that bad after all. In fact, you can benefit from all your previous bad choices right now. Make a list of every poor decision you’ve ever made.Now, go through the process of learning from each of them. What are the lessons you can learn? Imagine if you had done this same process after each mistake was made. Your life would be very different.Everyone makes bad decisions. The key is to make the most of them. Spend a few minutes each week reviewing your bad choices and learn from them. Most importantly, avoid repeating them. Move on from your bad decisions and benefit from them.
    Feb 10, 2018 360
  • 26 Jan 2018
    Each time I achieve success, I take a moment to acknowledge the feeling it gives me. I focus on the value that the achievement adds to my life. When I allow myself to be present in the moment, I am able to give thanks for the things that I attain.Thankfulness helps me to remain humble amidst the greatest victories. I remind myself that each thing I am able to do is a result of a blessing.I avoid taking any of the good things in life for granted. When I take the time to experience gratitude, I am able to honor the true value of the goodness that I receive. Each time I achieve a goal feels like the first time because I remain thankful.Gratitude encourages me to avoid having an inflated ego with each success. I recognize that each goal I go after requires that I repeat the process of centering myself.Taking myself back to that feeling of hunger reminds me that there are few promises in life. Hard work and humilitymake dreams a reality over and over.Today, I am thankful for the blessings of life. I am committed to maintaining humbleness so each success feels like the first one. My achievements are sweeter because I take the time to acknowledge their positive impact on my life.Self-Reflection Questions:1. How can I remind myself to maintain humility?2. How do I ensure ongoing gratitude when I am unable to achieve a target?3. What external sources serve as positive influences for me?
    461 Posted by Yolanda Moore
  • Each time I achieve success, I take a moment to acknowledge the feeling it gives me. I focus on the value that the achievement adds to my life. When I allow myself to be present in the moment, I am able to give thanks for the things that I attain.Thankfulness helps me to remain humble amidst the greatest victories. I remind myself that each thing I am able to do is a result of a blessing.I avoid taking any of the good things in life for granted. When I take the time to experience gratitude, I am able to honor the true value of the goodness that I receive. Each time I achieve a goal feels like the first time because I remain thankful.Gratitude encourages me to avoid having an inflated ego with each success. I recognize that each goal I go after requires that I repeat the process of centering myself.Taking myself back to that feeling of hunger reminds me that there are few promises in life. Hard work and humilitymake dreams a reality over and over.Today, I am thankful for the blessings of life. I am committed to maintaining humbleness so each success feels like the first one. My achievements are sweeter because I take the time to acknowledge their positive impact on my life.Self-Reflection Questions:1. How can I remind myself to maintain humility?2. How do I ensure ongoing gratitude when I am unable to achieve a target?3. What external sources serve as positive influences for me?
    Jan 26, 2018 461
  • 23 Jan 2018
    9 Strategies That Keep You From Being Offended So Easily Are you overly concerned with the opinions of others? Some people take this tendency way too far and are offended by the slightest perceived insults. Such a negative perspective results in feelings of anger and sadness. Fortunately, most people don’t have such ill intentions. Avoid taking offense without good cause: 1. Understand that it’s not about you 99% of the time. In most cases, the other person is in a bad mood, having a bad day, not intending to offend you, or just a jerk. There’s no reason to get upset by any of these situations. It might hurt a little, but it’s not about you at all. 2. Strengthen your self-esteem. Those with low self-esteem are more easily upset than those that feel more confident about themselves. There are plenty of books and websites dedicated to self-esteem and self-confidence. Raising your self-esteem can be a lot of work, but the rewards are worth it. 3. Avoid making assumptions. You must make some assumptions in order to be offended. At the very least, you must assume that you know the other person’s intentions. Often, you do not. Either assume the best or ask for clarification. You can avoid a lot of drama if you can stop making assumptions. 4. Watch your inner voice. When you notice yourself getting upset, ask yourself “why.” Determine if you really have a good reason. Did the other person mean what you think they meant? Could you be wrong? What is he trying to say? 5. Remember that you offend people all the time. Your taste in clothes, music, or religion are offensive to some. You may have offended someone when you said you didn’t like a particular movie. Did you mean to be offensive? Is it possible the other person is being too sensitive? Is it possible you’re being too sensitive when you feel offended? 6. Learn to be detached from the opinions of others. Others can offer helpful advice. However, that doesn’t mean you have to take everything others say to heart. Consider the merits of what was said without the involvement of your ego. Gain what you can from the comment and then let it go. 7. Give others a break. No one is perfect. You’ve misspoken at times or had a bad day. Give others the same consideration you’d like to receive when you misspeak. Most people are doing the best they can each day. 8. Give yourself a break. Avoid jumping to the worst possible conclusion each time you hear something you don’t like. Think enough of yourself that you can make more positive assumptions. 9. Be a better listener. If you’re offended, you’ve stopped listening and climbed into your own head. You’re so busy trying to figure out what it all means that you’ve stopped paying attention. Good listening skills will minimize your sensitivity. You can choose to respond differently than you have in the past when someone says something you take personally. Feeling offended is a choice. You can choose other options. Make your self-esteem a priority. You’ll be offended less frequently if you feel better about yourself. Raise your impression of others. Most people aren’t trying to give you any grief. Everyone says the wrong thing occasionally. Maybe it was just your turn to hear it. Give everyone, and yourself, the benefit of the doubt. You’ll find that your days are more rewarding.    
    513 Posted by Yolanda Moore
  • 9 Strategies That Keep You From Being Offended So Easily Are you overly concerned with the opinions of others? Some people take this tendency way too far and are offended by the slightest perceived insults. Such a negative perspective results in feelings of anger and sadness. Fortunately, most people don’t have such ill intentions. Avoid taking offense without good cause: 1. Understand that it’s not about you 99% of the time. In most cases, the other person is in a bad mood, having a bad day, not intending to offend you, or just a jerk. There’s no reason to get upset by any of these situations. It might hurt a little, but it’s not about you at all. 2. Strengthen your self-esteem. Those with low self-esteem are more easily upset than those that feel more confident about themselves. There are plenty of books and websites dedicated to self-esteem and self-confidence. Raising your self-esteem can be a lot of work, but the rewards are worth it. 3. Avoid making assumptions. You must make some assumptions in order to be offended. At the very least, you must assume that you know the other person’s intentions. Often, you do not. Either assume the best or ask for clarification. You can avoid a lot of drama if you can stop making assumptions. 4. Watch your inner voice. When you notice yourself getting upset, ask yourself “why.” Determine if you really have a good reason. Did the other person mean what you think they meant? Could you be wrong? What is he trying to say? 5. Remember that you offend people all the time. Your taste in clothes, music, or religion are offensive to some. You may have offended someone when you said you didn’t like a particular movie. Did you mean to be offensive? Is it possible the other person is being too sensitive? Is it possible you’re being too sensitive when you feel offended? 6. Learn to be detached from the opinions of others. Others can offer helpful advice. However, that doesn’t mean you have to take everything others say to heart. Consider the merits of what was said without the involvement of your ego. Gain what you can from the comment and then let it go. 7. Give others a break. No one is perfect. You’ve misspoken at times or had a bad day. Give others the same consideration you’d like to receive when you misspeak. Most people are doing the best they can each day. 8. Give yourself a break. Avoid jumping to the worst possible conclusion each time you hear something you don’t like. Think enough of yourself that you can make more positive assumptions. 9. Be a better listener. If you’re offended, you’ve stopped listening and climbed into your own head. You’re so busy trying to figure out what it all means that you’ve stopped paying attention. Good listening skills will minimize your sensitivity. You can choose to respond differently than you have in the past when someone says something you take personally. Feeling offended is a choice. You can choose other options. Make your self-esteem a priority. You’ll be offended less frequently if you feel better about yourself. Raise your impression of others. Most people aren’t trying to give you any grief. Everyone says the wrong thing occasionally. Maybe it was just your turn to hear it. Give everyone, and yourself, the benefit of the doubt. You’ll find that your days are more rewarding.    
    Jan 23, 2018 513
  • 26 Dec 2017
    Let’s not just talk about counting our blessings—let’s do it! Write a list of 100 things you are thankful for. If that sounds like it is too many, try this: Write 10 physical abilities you are grateful for. Write 10 material possessions you are grateful for. Write 20 people you are grateful for. Write 10 things about nature you are grateful for. Write 10 things about today you are grateful for. Write 10 feelings you are grateful for. Write 10 modern inventions you are grateful for. Write 10 foods you are grateful for. Write 10 things about the UNIVERSE you are grateful for. When we make a list like this, we discover that a list of 100 doesn’t even begin to scratch the surface of all the things God has given us.
    584 Posted by Yolanda Moore
  • Let’s not just talk about counting our blessings—let’s do it! Write a list of 100 things you are thankful for. If that sounds like it is too many, try this: Write 10 physical abilities you are grateful for. Write 10 material possessions you are grateful for. Write 20 people you are grateful for. Write 10 things about nature you are grateful for. Write 10 things about today you are grateful for. Write 10 feelings you are grateful for. Write 10 modern inventions you are grateful for. Write 10 foods you are grateful for. Write 10 things about the UNIVERSE you are grateful for. When we make a list like this, we discover that a list of 100 doesn’t even begin to scratch the surface of all the things God has given us.
    Dec 26, 2017 584
  • 11 Dec 2017
      You’re familiar with your conscious mind. You use it to choose a channel on the TV or to decide what you’re going to have for dinner. But there’s another aspect to your mind, the subconscious. Your subconscious is most active during sleep and when you’re mildly distracted. Consider how many brilliant ideas you’ve had while showering, driving, mowing the grass, or taking a walk. When you’re alone and relaxed, but mildly occupied, your subconscious can shine. Your conscious mind is occupied enough for your subconscious to speak to you. During most of the day, your conscious mind is making too much noise. Your subconscious is active day and night. Few people take advantage of this powerful resource. Imagine having such a powerful ally working for you 24/7. You’d be unstoppable. Your subconscious is a bit like a savant. It’s brilliant in some ways, but not too bright in others. Think of it as a computer with a vast store of information. It wants to help you, but it needs simple instructions. So how can you take advantage of this powerful resource? Use this process to put your subconscious to work for you: 1. Make a request of your subconscious mind. While lying in bed at night, tell your subconscious what you want. Write it down. There’s something more concrete when you take pen to paper. It also engages your brain at a higher level. For example: “I want to find three creative, effective, and inexpensive ways to market my business.” Read the request aloud five times. 1. Write your request five times and then turn off the light. 2. Imagine yourself being successful. In our example, how will you feel when you find and implement these three creative ideas? How will your life and finances change? 3. Repeat steps one and two in the morning. It will only take three minutes. You can do it. Of course, you won’t be turning off the light when you’re finished. It’s time to start your day! 4. Pay attention. You’ll find your subconscious feeding you solutions over the next few days. It’s important to pay attention to them. Write them down. Thank your subconscious for the information. 5. Act on the information. This is the biggest sticking point for most people. We love to gather information, but fail to act. Use the ideas that are presented by your subconscious. If you fail to act on them, you’ll eventually stop receiving them. No one likes to be ignored, including your subconscious! Even the smallest action can have a big impact. Avoid being like everyone else that ignores their great ideas. 6. Be patient. While your subconscious can present you with advice very quickly, implementing habit changes can take weeks. For example, if you want your subconscious to assist you in changing your diet and exercise habits, you might not see any progress for a few weeks. Be patient. The subconscious is a powerful tool that few use to their advantage. It’s been suggested that your subconscious can consider billions of possibilities during a night of sleep. The information your subconscious provides is very high quality. It’s the best your brain has to offer from billions of options. Why aren’t you using it? Start small so you can experience a few easy successes. The confidence you’ll gain will be beneficial when making requests that require more time to fulfill. Your subconscious is always busy, so ensure it’s busy working on the things you desire!
    2835 Posted by Yolanda Moore
  •   You’re familiar with your conscious mind. You use it to choose a channel on the TV or to decide what you’re going to have for dinner. But there’s another aspect to your mind, the subconscious. Your subconscious is most active during sleep and when you’re mildly distracted. Consider how many brilliant ideas you’ve had while showering, driving, mowing the grass, or taking a walk. When you’re alone and relaxed, but mildly occupied, your subconscious can shine. Your conscious mind is occupied enough for your subconscious to speak to you. During most of the day, your conscious mind is making too much noise. Your subconscious is active day and night. Few people take advantage of this powerful resource. Imagine having such a powerful ally working for you 24/7. You’d be unstoppable. Your subconscious is a bit like a savant. It’s brilliant in some ways, but not too bright in others. Think of it as a computer with a vast store of information. It wants to help you, but it needs simple instructions. So how can you take advantage of this powerful resource? Use this process to put your subconscious to work for you: 1. Make a request of your subconscious mind. While lying in bed at night, tell your subconscious what you want. Write it down. There’s something more concrete when you take pen to paper. It also engages your brain at a higher level. For example: “I want to find three creative, effective, and inexpensive ways to market my business.” Read the request aloud five times. 1. Write your request five times and then turn off the light. 2. Imagine yourself being successful. In our example, how will you feel when you find and implement these three creative ideas? How will your life and finances change? 3. Repeat steps one and two in the morning. It will only take three minutes. You can do it. Of course, you won’t be turning off the light when you’re finished. It’s time to start your day! 4. Pay attention. You’ll find your subconscious feeding you solutions over the next few days. It’s important to pay attention to them. Write them down. Thank your subconscious for the information. 5. Act on the information. This is the biggest sticking point for most people. We love to gather information, but fail to act. Use the ideas that are presented by your subconscious. If you fail to act on them, you’ll eventually stop receiving them. No one likes to be ignored, including your subconscious! Even the smallest action can have a big impact. Avoid being like everyone else that ignores their great ideas. 6. Be patient. While your subconscious can present you with advice very quickly, implementing habit changes can take weeks. For example, if you want your subconscious to assist you in changing your diet and exercise habits, you might not see any progress for a few weeks. Be patient. The subconscious is a powerful tool that few use to their advantage. It’s been suggested that your subconscious can consider billions of possibilities during a night of sleep. The information your subconscious provides is very high quality. It’s the best your brain has to offer from billions of options. Why aren’t you using it? Start small so you can experience a few easy successes. The confidence you’ll gain will be beneficial when making requests that require more time to fulfill. Your subconscious is always busy, so ensure it’s busy working on the things you desire!
    Dec 11, 2017 2835
  • 27 Nov 2017
    Focus on Opportunities Most things that happen to us can be seen as either opportunity or as an obstacle. It depends on what we focus on. Choose to see everything as a blessing, as a stepping stone for something greater. What’s your outlook on things? Do you focus on finding opportunities or do you only see the risks & obstacles?
    849 Posted by Yolanda Moore
  • Focus on Opportunities Most things that happen to us can be seen as either opportunity or as an obstacle. It depends on what we focus on. Choose to see everything as a blessing, as a stepping stone for something greater. What’s your outlook on things? Do you focus on finding opportunities or do you only see the risks & obstacles?
    Nov 27, 2017 849
  • 13 Nov 2017
    We’ve all heard the saying: “There’s no time like the present”, which of course means the best time to take action is now. But that statement is more than a cute quote; it’s the most accurate statement you can make. There is no time like the present, because the present is all that exists. The past and future are constructs of our mind and cannot exist outside our mind. Now is all there is. Put simply, mindfulness is the acceptance of now. When you’re mindful you’re moving your mind beyond the past and future and simply being in the present. It sounds obvious and it is, but very few people live in the now. At most, we experience glimpses of mindfulness (especially in a life or death situation), but most of the time we either fret over the past or are planning for the future. In order to better understand mindfulness, it’s important to understand what it’s not, as much as what it is. Mindfulness is NOT about distracting yourself with whatever is around you. Examples include looking at your phone every 5 minutes, or checking your Facebook profile constantly, or reading the news or even multi-tasking. It’s also about not letting yourself get distracted, which is quite easy today. Email notifications, advertisements, and the conversation from your work colleagues down the hall etc. In other words, it’s fully being in the moment no matter what else is around you. There is no one right way to be mindful, but the popular suggestions are to focus your attention on whatever you’re doing at the time. For example, if you’re eating, you pay attention to every bite. You see, feel, taste and smell the food and appreciate every morsel you ingest. When you’re walking you pay attention to your body and how it moves and every step you take. When you’re speaking to another person you are solely focused on that person and what they are saying and fully engaged in every word of the conversation. When you’re working, you pay full attention to the work at hand. When you’re driving you only focus on your movements while you drive and the traffic around you. All of these suggestions come down to accepting the now and not letting your mind move to the past or future (i.e. while eating lunch you’re planning the rest of your work day). From my perspective, true mindfulness requires two steps. Accepting the now (difficult enough for most people, but possible) and deliberately interpreting the now as positively as you can. It’s one thing to accept and live in the now of a traffic jam, it’s quite another to accept the traffic jam as an opportunity to appreciate the car you sit in, the ability for you to drive at all, how well traffic flows overall, the scenery around you etc. That’s true mindfulness, because not only are you conscious of the now, your conscious of how you’re feeling about the now. Deliberate interpretation of the now seems like a contradiction, because when you’re mindful you’re not thinking, you’re simply being. But for many those are fleeting moments that are difficult to sustain. Your mind will come back, so why not use it as a tool to continue to focus on the now in a positive way. In other words, you direct where your thoughts should go, in the present moment. So there you go. Mindfulness explained the Dave Asch way. What do you think? Agree disagree? Let’s extend this conversation further by sharing your thoughts.
    1747 Posted by Dave A
  • Dave ABy Dave A
    We’ve all heard the saying: “There’s no time like the present”, which of course means the best time to take action is now. But that statement is more than a cute quote; it’s the most accurate statement you can make. There is no time like the present, because the present is all that exists. The past and future are constructs of our mind and cannot exist outside our mind. Now is all there is. Put simply, mindfulness is the acceptance of now. When you’re mindful you’re moving your mind beyond the past and future and simply being in the present. It sounds obvious and it is, but very few people live in the now. At most, we experience glimpses of mindfulness (especially in a life or death situation), but most of the time we either fret over the past or are planning for the future. In order to better understand mindfulness, it’s important to understand what it’s not, as much as what it is. Mindfulness is NOT about distracting yourself with whatever is around you. Examples include looking at your phone every 5 minutes, or checking your Facebook profile constantly, or reading the news or even multi-tasking. It’s also about not letting yourself get distracted, which is quite easy today. Email notifications, advertisements, and the conversation from your work colleagues down the hall etc. In other words, it’s fully being in the moment no matter what else is around you. There is no one right way to be mindful, but the popular suggestions are to focus your attention on whatever you’re doing at the time. For example, if you’re eating, you pay attention to every bite. You see, feel, taste and smell the food and appreciate every morsel you ingest. When you’re walking you pay attention to your body and how it moves and every step you take. When you’re speaking to another person you are solely focused on that person and what they are saying and fully engaged in every word of the conversation. When you’re working, you pay full attention to the work at hand. When you’re driving you only focus on your movements while you drive and the traffic around you. All of these suggestions come down to accepting the now and not letting your mind move to the past or future (i.e. while eating lunch you’re planning the rest of your work day). From my perspective, true mindfulness requires two steps. Accepting the now (difficult enough for most people, but possible) and deliberately interpreting the now as positively as you can. It’s one thing to accept and live in the now of a traffic jam, it’s quite another to accept the traffic jam as an opportunity to appreciate the car you sit in, the ability for you to drive at all, how well traffic flows overall, the scenery around you etc. That’s true mindfulness, because not only are you conscious of the now, your conscious of how you’re feeling about the now. Deliberate interpretation of the now seems like a contradiction, because when you’re mindful you’re not thinking, you’re simply being. But for many those are fleeting moments that are difficult to sustain. Your mind will come back, so why not use it as a tool to continue to focus on the now in a positive way. In other words, you direct where your thoughts should go, in the present moment. So there you go. Mindfulness explained the Dave Asch way. What do you think? Agree disagree? Let’s extend this conversation further by sharing your thoughts.
    Nov 13, 2017 1747